A stitch a day…

I’m a tad exhausted today. The past three weeks have been a lot of fun and a lot of a LOT. It’s been ace – we’ve had a friend and her family visiting us – and travelled (a lot) . We’ve had D&V (a lot) which hasn’t been a lot of fun, and I’ve taken my lovely knitting bag, yarn, needles and stabby-bum pandas across the country for a while. I might manage a stitch or two this evening, finish just one more round…

The beauty of a project like Cobain is that when you’ve done (a lot) of prep in the beginning, with a few rows of garter stitch (row of knit, then row of purl stitches, ad nauseam, or just rows of knit stitch on circular needles) then made some impressive holes in the back (on purpose, part of the pattern and SO much easier than imagined), is that when it gets to the length-making section – which I’m sure there’s a proper term for and I’ll get back to that at some point in the future – there’s no pattern to remember more than a repeat of two rows . Perfect for us newbie knitters. Or me, at least. Even I can remember 2 rows on a constant repeat. *ahem* please don’t look too closely as I may have lost/created extra “lace hole bits” *ahem* Mistakes make it an original and all that.

I’m not giving anything away by putting that in, I’m really not. I won’t give out paid-for pattern info on here unless it’s something that I think “WTAF does that mean? Is it even in English? Croatian?” and will throw my hands in the air and begin one of my tantrums, hoping a kind, gentle, long-suffering knitting friend will come along and help me out. Or just point out that I’m being a child and there’s nothing difficult involved in solving a dropped stitch. There really isn’t.

Techniques

There are two ways to knit. One is Continental (which is when you hold the yarn in your left hand, for us #newbieknitters )and the other is English knitting (hold yarn in the right and “throw” it over the needles). [As a #newbieknitter , do yourself a favour and step away from the wiki when it comes to looking up knitting terminology. Seriously. I inadvertently ended up on wikipedia when I Ecosia-searched for it (I’m using Ecosia.org  for my search engine now, to help plant trees. That I can eventually travel to hug. Or something) I need a new term because “Googling” has become so intrinsically linked to the vernacular, Ecosiaing sounds ridiculous in comparison. But you get my drift – and my oooh! shiny! moment has hit again. Distracta-bunny in the house – don’t Wiki-knitting. Just don’t. It’ll put you off for life. Perhaps just infuriate your post-Prosecco-evening head *cough* with terminology that you truly don’t need to be reading Right Now. ]

I digressed. Sorry. Knitting techniques. I have become accustomed to the English knitting style with the yarn in my right hand, throwing it over the needles in gay abandon, hoping to miraculously create garments of wonder. A couple of weeks ago, prior to my friends’ visit, I decided to get on good old tube of the You and have a peek at Continental.

As a crocheter first and foremost, I can see why so many people told me to Continental-it. I would say my tension requires a lot (there it is again) of improvement with Continental as my knitting went rather loopy but it DID work. It was definitely faster. I may even try it fully on another project sometime. Perhaps Project 5. At the moment, however, I’m sticking to English “throw that yarn on the needle and clap your hands three times whilst spinning around on your middle toe only” technique as it seems to be working. Shhhh. Don’t tell Cobain that. It might take offence at my mild smugness and throw me a “ha! I’ve just undone myself and dropped a gazillion stitches” moment whilst sitting unattended in my knitting bag. You just never know. Yarn can be pesky that way.

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s